Overhang

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Overhang'

A measure of the potential dilution to which a common stock's existing shareholders are exposed due to the potential that stock-based compensation will be awarded to executives, directors or key employees of the company. It is usually represented in percentage form and is calculated as stock options granted, plus the remaining options that have yet to be granted divided by the total shares outstanding.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Overhang'

There is no precise rule-of-thumb for determining what level of options overhang is bad for investors but, generally speaking, the higher the number, the greater the risk. If a company has a very high options overhang, it must generate even higher levels of growth in order to provide decent returns to investors net of the overhang's dilutive effects on investor returns.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Fully Diluted Shares

    The total number of shares that would be outstanding if all possible ...
  2. Incentive Stock Option - ISO

    A type of employee stock option with a tax benefit, when you ...
  3. Employee Stock Ownership Plan - ...

    A qualified, defined contribution, employee benefit (ERISA) plan ...
  4. Non-Qualified Stock Option - NSO

    A type of employee stock option where you pay ordinary income ...
  5. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  6. Exercise

    To put into effect the right specified in a contract. In options ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What does the underlying of a derivative refer to?

    A derivative security is a financial instrument in which the price of the derivative is dependent on its underlying asset. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What kinds of derivatives are types of contingent claims?

    A contingent claim is another term for a derivative with a payout that is dependent on the realization of some uncertain ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does it mean to take delivery of a derivative contract?

    When trading derivative contracts for options, a buyer or holder may have to take delivery of the underlying asset if the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can derivatives be used for speculation?

    Derivative securities could be bought or sold to speculate on the future price of the underlying assets. Derivative securities' ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does it mean to roll a derivative contract?

    A derivative is a financial instrument in which the price of the derivative is dependent on an underlying asset. A derivative ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can derivatives be used for risk management?

    Derivatives could be used in risk management by hedging a position to protect against the risk of an adverse move in an asset. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    The "True" Cost Of Stock Options

    Perhaps the real cost of employee stock options is already accounted for in the expense of buyback programs.
  2. Options & Futures

    A New Approach To Equity Compensation

    The new financial accounting standard known as FAS 123R could take a bite out of your portfolio. Find out why here.
  3. Options & Futures

    Should Employees Be Compensated With Stock Options?

    Learn the good, the bad and the ugly sides of this type of payout.
  4. Options & Futures

    The Controversy Over Option Expensing

    There has been much debate over whether companies should treat employee stocks options as an expense. This article examines both sides of the argument.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Trademarks Of A Takeover Target

    These tips can lead you to little companies with big prospects.
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Accounting and Valuing Employee Stock Options

    Learn the different accounting and valuation treatments of ESOs, and discover the best ways to incorporate these techniques into your analysis of stock.
  7. Investing

    The Strong Dollar’s (Real) Toll On Tech Stocks

    A large portion of U.S. technology companies’ sales occur overseas, given the strong international business and consumer demand from many U.S. tech firms.
  8. Stock Analysis

    Google Stock: A Tale of Two Share Classes

    Google stock comes in two different flavors with different rights for shareholders.
  9. Economics

    What is a Business Model?

    Business model is the term for a company’s plan as to how it will earn revenue.
  10. Investing

    What More Volatility Means For Momentum Stocks

    One byproduct of the recent tick higher in bond yields: a meaningful rise in volatility for both stocks and bonds.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center