Overleveraged

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Overleveraged'

Occurs when a business is carrying too much debt, and is unable to pay interest payments from loans. Overleveraged companies are unable to pay their expenses because of over excessive costs. This is the formula for financial leverage:


Financial Leverage = Operating Income / Net Income

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Overleveraged'

Occurs when a business has borrowed too much debt, and is unable to pay interest payments on the debts. Companies that borrow too much and are overleveraged are at the risk of becoming bankrupt if their business does poorly. A company not overly leveraged is better able to sustain drops in their business profits. Businesses that borrow money to add to a product line, expand internationally or upgrade their facilities are often better able to offset the risk they take on when leveraging.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Leverage Ratio

    Any ratio used to calculate the financial leverage of a company ...
  2. Degree Of Financial Leverage - ...

    A ratio that measures the sensitivity of a company’s earnings ...
  3. Debt/Equity Ratio

    A measure of a company's financial leverage calculated by dividing ...
  4. Debt Financing

    When a firm raises money for working capital or capital expenditures ...
  5. Leveraged Buyout - LBO

    The acquisition of another company using a significant amount ...
  6. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the effective interest method of amortization?

    The effective interest method is an accounting practice used for discounting a bond. This method is used for bonds sold at ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does an unfavorable variance indicate to management?

    In managerial accounting, an unfavorable variance is discovered when a company's management performs a comparison between ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is there a way to include intangible assets in book-to-market ratio calculations?

    The book-to-market ratio is used in fundamental analysis to identify whether a company's securities are overvalued or undervalued. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some of the limitations and drawbacks of using a payback period for analysis?

    Limitations, or disadvantages, of using the payback period method in capital budgeting include the fact that it fails to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the similarities and differences between the savings and loan (S&L) crisis ...

    The savings and loan crisis and the subprime mortgage crisis both began with banks creating new profit centers following ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Will Corporate Debt Drag Your Stock Down?

    Borrowed funds can mean a leg up for companies or the boot for investors. Find out how to tell the difference.
  2. Investing Basics

    What Is A Corporate Credit Rating?

    Is the bond you're buying investment grade, or just junk? Find out how to check the score.
  3. Retirement

    Understanding Credit Card Interest

    Paying these rates can impact your disposable income and your investment returns.
  4. Investing

    Off-Balance-Sheet Entities: An Introduction

    The theory and practice of these entities varies greatly. Investors need to learn what they're getting into.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Overview Of Corporate Bankruptcy

    If a company files for bankruptcy, stockholders have the most to lose. Find out why.
  6. Investing

    Debt Reckoning

    Learn about debt ratios and how to use them to assess a company's financial health. You could save a lot of money!
  7. Investing

    Spotting Cash Cows

    We show you why some of these companies stand apart from the herd.
  8. Economics

    Calculating Net Realizable Value

    An asset’s net realizable value is the amount a company should expect to receive once it sells or disposes of that asset, minus costs from its disposal.
  9. Investing Basics

    Calculating Unlevered Free Cash Flow

    Unlevered free cash flow (UFCF) is the free cash flow of a business before interest payments.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Degree of Financial Leverage

    Degree of financial leverage (DFL) is a metric that measures the sensitivity of a company’s operating income due to changes in its capital structure.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  2. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  3. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  4. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  5. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  6. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!