Overseas Private Investment Corporation - OPIC

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DEFINITION of 'Overseas Private Investment Corporation - OPIC'

A U.S. government agency that assists businesses looking to invest abroad. Operated out of Washington, D.C., the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) helps companies investing overseas analyze and manage risks and tries to promote development in emerging markets in addition to supporting domestic foreign policies.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Overseas Private Investment Corporation - OPIC'

The Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) supports projects that reinforce and are aligned with current U.S. foreign policy. These are projects that are believed to foster political stability and free market ideals. OPIC also offers political risk insurance for businesses and investors as protection from expropriation risks, political violence and other country risks.

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