Oversubscription Privilege

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Oversubscription Privilege'

A privilege provided to existing shareholders in a company when the company issues a rights or warrants offering. This enables shareholders to "subscribe" to purchase extra shares that are not picked up by the remaining shareholders.

When a company issues a rights or warrants offering, existing shareholders are given the option to maintain their current percentage of ownership in the company by acquiring the rights to further shares. If any current shareholders decide to not accept all of the rights for which they are eligible, these extra rights/warrants become available to the rest of the shareholders at a predetermined ratio (ie. the right to purchase 0.25 shares for every existing share held).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Oversubscription Privilege'

There will always be a maximum number of rights or warrants available on the whole, and should there be more oversubscription demand than supply available, whatever is left over will be allocated on a pro-rata basis to those who pick up their oversubscription privilege.

Companies that decide to issue a rights or warrants offering do so in lieu of a secondary stock offering, which would be available to other investors as well. While the goal of all three offerings is to raise capital for the issuer, if a company bypasses conducting a secondary stock offering, then it shows investor demand is not high enough for them to do so.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Warrant

    A derivative security that gives the holder the right to purchase ...
  2. Rights

    A security giving stockholders entitlement to purchase new shares ...
  3. Rights Offering (Issue)

    An issue of rights to a company's existing shareholders that ...
  4. Secondary Offering

    1. The issuance of new stock for public sale from a company that ...
  5. Share Purchase Rights

    A type of security that gives the holder the option, but not ...
  6. Backstop Purchaser

    An entity that agrees to purchase all the remaining, unsubscribed ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    A Look At Primary And Secondary Markets

    Knowing how the primary and secondary markets work is key to understanding how stocks trade.
  2. Options & Futures

    Warrants: A High-Return Investment Tool

    Discover the advantages of this largely unexploited investment vehicle.
  3. Options & Futures

    Understanding Rights Issues

    Not sure what to do if a company invites you to buy more shares at discount? Here are some of your options.
  4. Options & Futures

    I own some stock warrants. How do I exercise them?

    Typically, stock warrants are derivative instruments added to new issues of stocks or bonds to make these issues more attractive. The warrants are extra benefits that give their holders the right ...
  5. Investing Basics

    Enterprise Resource Planning System: A How To

    An ERP system won’t transform poor management into good management, but the real-time business analytics can help make good management even better.
  6. Investing Basics

    How To Calculate Goodwill

    Goodwill is an intangible, but it is still possible to effectively calculate or estimate goodwill for a company.
  7. Investing Basics

    Using Appreciative Inquiry To Solve Management Problems

    In its purest form, appreciative inquiry is a powerful tool for shifting the focus of an organization to something much greater than its bottom line - although the eventual outcome will often ...
  8. Investing Basics

    The Basics Of Value Chain Analysis

    Value chain analysis establishes an action plan to understand and implement actvities that create values to a firm's clients, resulting in firm profits.
  9. Investing Basics

    Top Tools for ERP Enterprise Resource Planning

    Top tools used in Enterprise Resource Planning with its characteristics - Explaining the main tools companies use when using Enterprise Resource Planning appraoch
  10. Investing Basics

    Analysis of Companies with high goodwill

    High goodwill as a percentage of market cap can actually be a big red flag--it potentially means the company botched a major acquisition.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  2. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  3. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
  4. Simple Interest

    A quick method of calculating the interest charge on a loan. Simple interest is determined by multiplying the interest rate ...
  5. Special Administrative Region - SAR

    Unique geographical areas with a high degree of autonomy set up by the People's Republic of China. The Special Administrative ...
  6. Annual Percentage Rate - APR

    The annual rate that is charged for borrowing (or made by investing), expressed as a single percentage number that represents ...
Trading Center