Overtrading

Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Overtrading'


1. Excessive buying and selling of stocks by a broker on an investor's behalf in order to increase the commission the broker collects.

This situation has been known to arise when brokers are pressured to place a newly issued security underwritten by a firm's investment banking arm.

Also known as "churning".

2. A situation in which a company is growing its sales faster than it can finance them. This usually leads to enormous accounts payable or accounts receivable and a lack of working capital to finance operations.



Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Overtrading'


1. One way to protect yourself from overtrading (churning) is through a wrap account - a type of account that is manged for a flat rate rather than charging commission on every transaction.

2. Many businesses become insolvent because they try to accommodate everyone who wishes to purchase their products. This ultimately leads to not being able to pay for the financing costs used to produce the goods.

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  2. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  3. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  4. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  5. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  6. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
Trading Center