Owner Earnings Run Rate

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DEFINITION of 'Owner Earnings Run Rate'

An extrapolated estimate of an owner's earnings (free cash flow) over a defined period of time (typically a year). This assumes that the firm's financial performance stays consistent throughout the period. Therefore, this estimate can be difficult to assess if the firm is operating in a business that experiences seasonality, because owner earnings from one period may not be applicable across the entire time period.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Owner Earnings Run Rate'

For example, after three quarters of performance, the company's owner earnings is $9 million. Assuming that performance stays consistent, the company's owner earnings run rate for the fiscal year would be $12 million ($3 million per quarter).

Owner earnings is often an important metric that investor's can use to gauge a firm's financial health. Increased owner earnings tend to act as a signal that a company's subsequent earnings will be good. Therefore, assessing an accurate owner earnings run rate could be very important in predicting the company's longer term performance.

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