Paid-Up

DEFINITION of 'Paid-Up'

The state of a settlement when all payment obligations for a security have been completed in a customer account. When an individual has paid up, he or she has paid for the security in full.

BREAKING DOWN 'Paid-Up'

For example, when an investor buys stock, he/she is given three days to pay (known as the three-day settlement period). If the investor does not pay the balance owing for the purchase by day three, the brokerage has the right to liquidate the holdings until the balance is paid-up, or paid in full. This also applies to margin accounts with outstanding margin calls and interest charges that need to be paid-up before a broker will allow a client to resume trading in the account.

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