Paid-Up Capital


DEFINITION of 'Paid-Up Capital'

The amount of a company's capital that has been funded by shareholders. Paid-up capital can be less than a company's total capital because a company may not issue all of the shares that it has been authorized to sell. Paid-up capital can also reflect how a company depends on equity financing.


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BREAKING DOWN 'Paid-Up Capital'

Paid-up capital is money that a company has received from the sale of its shares, and represents money that is not borrowed. A company that is fully paid-up has sold all available shares, and thus cannot increase its capital unless it borrows money through debt or is authorized to sell more shares.

  1. Outstanding Shares

    A company's stock currently held by all its shareholders, including ...
  2. Float

    Money in the banking system that is briefly counted twice due ...
  3. Authorized Stock

    The maximum number of shares that a corporation is legally permitted ...
  4. Capital

    1) Financial assets or the financial value of assets, such as ...
  5. Shareholder

    Any person, company or other institution that owns at least one ...
  6. Authorized Share Capital

    The number of stock units that a publicly traded company can ...
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