Paired Shares

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Paired Shares'

The stock of two separate companies that are under the management or supervision of a single corporation. Paired shares are traded as if they are one stock and are sold as one unit. The stock of both companies typically appears on one stock certificate, with each stock printed on one side of the stock certificate. In general, one stock yields a higher dividend, while the other has a greater potential for growth. A share of stock is a type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation and represents a claim on part of the corporation's assets and earnings.

Also called "Siamese Shares" and "Stapled Stock."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Paired Shares'

For example, Carnival Corporation and plc (known previously as P&O Princess Cruises plc), completed a dual listed company transaction in April 2003. Shares of Carnival Corporation common stock were paired with trust shares of beneficial interest in the P&O Princess Special Voting Trust. These new shares were referred to as the "trust shares" or "paired shares."

RELATED TERMS
  1. Contingent Shares

    Shares of company stock that are issued only if certain conditions ...
  2. Stock

    A type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation ...
  3. Common Stock

    A security that represents ownership in a corporation. Holders ...
  4. Earnings

    The amount of profit that a company produces during a specific ...
  5. Shares

    A unit of ownership interest in a corporation or financial asset. ...
  6. Separation Of Powers

    An organizational structure in which responsibilities, authorities, ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Stock Basics Tutorial

    If you're new to the stock market and want the basics, this is the tutorial for you!
  2. Technical Indicators

    What are the signs of a bear market rally?

    Read about some of the signs of a bear market rally, an unpredictable bull movement that takes place in the middle of a stronger downtrend.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    Why are OTC (over-the-counter) transactions controversial?

    Learn more about over-the-counter transactions, and why OTC traders are considered riskier than traders working with larger market exchanges.
  4. Forex Education

    What's the difference between bid-ask spread and bid-ask bounce?

    Understand the difference between the bid-ask spread that determines the buy or sell price for a stock and a bid-ask bounce, a situational price volatility.
  5. Options & Futures

    How do you trade put options on E*TRADE?

    Learn all about put option trading at E*TRADE. Explore margin accounts and become familiar with the different types of option writing.
  6. Options & Futures

    Do you have to be an expert investor to trade put options?

    Learn about investing in put options and the associated risks. Explore how options can provide risk, which is precisely defined to predetermined limits.
  7. Options & Futures

    Are put options more difficult to trade than call options?

    Learn about the difficulty of trading both call and put options. Explore how put options earn profits with underlying assets fall in value.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How do hedge funds use short selling?

    Learn how hedge funds use short selling to profit from stocks that are falling in price. Explore different analytical techniques hedge funds employ to find investments.
  9. Options & Futures

    Is short selling a form of insurance?

    Explore short selling and put options. Learn how put options may be used as insurance to protect positions, and costs associated with using this method.
  10. Investing Basics

    How long can a trader keep a short position?

    Learn whether there are any limitations on how long may an investor hold a short position, and explore the costs associated with short selling.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Command Economy

    A system where the government, rather than the free market, determines what goods should be produced, how much should be ...
  2. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  3. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  4. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  5. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  6. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
Trading Center