DEFINITION of 'Panel Bank'

The name given to the group of banks contributing to the Euro Interbank Offer Rate (EURIBOR). This group is made up of the largest participants within the Euro money market. The panel bank complies daily quotes on the interest rates that banks offer one another for overnight loans. The resulting figure, the EURIBOR, is similar to London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR). The EURIBOR is used as a reference rate for bonds, swaps, loans and other instruments.

BREAKING DOWN 'Panel Bank'

Panel bank institutions transact the largest volumes within the Euro market, and provide stability and liquidity. Furthermore, these banks are located both inside and outside of Europe, and aren't always associated with regions recognizing the EU.

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