Paradigm Shift

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Paradigm Shift'

A major change in how some process is accomplished. A paradigm shift can happen when new technology is introduced that radically alters the production process of a good. For example, the assembly line created a substantial paradigm shift not only in the auto industry, but in all other areas of manufacturing as well.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Paradigm Shift'

Paradigm shifts can require that entire departments be eliminated or created in some cases, and millions or even billions of dollars of new equipment purchased while the old equipment is sold or recycled. Paradigm shifts have become much more frequent in the past hundred years, as the industrial revolution has transformed many social and industrial processes. This process is likely to become even more commonplace in the future as our rate of technological advancement increases.

RELATED TERMS
  1. New Paradigm

    In the investing world, a new paradigm is a totally new way of ...
  2. Eclectic Paradigm

    A theory that provides a three-tiered framework for a company ...
  3. New Economy

    A buzzword describing new, high-growth industries that are on ...
  4. Silicon Valley

    A part of the San Francisco Bay Area that is known for the many ...
  5. Old Economy

    A term for the old blue chip industries that enjoyed fabulous ...
  6. Monopoly

    A situation in which a single company or group owns all or nearly ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between old- and new-economy stocks?

    Old-economy stocks represent large, well-established companies that participate in more traditional industry sectors and ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Brains Don't Always Bring The Bucks

    Common mistakes can prevent even the smartest investors from beating the market.
  2. Investing

    What's a Debit Note?

    A debit note is a document used by a seller to inform a purchaser of a dollar amount owed. As the name indicates, it is a note from the seller that a debit has been made to the purchaser’s account. ...
  3. Professionals

    What does C-Suite Mean?

    C-Suite is a slang term used to describe the highest level senior executives of a corporation. This is the decision-making, power center of a company. These individuals are usually paid well, ...
  4. Investing

    What's a Monopolistic Market?

    A monopolistic market has a significant number of characteristics of a pure monopoly. Though there may be more than one supplier, the market has high prices, suppliers tightly control availability ...
  5. Professionals

    What's Human Capital?

    Human capital is a company asset, but it’s not listed on the balance sheet. Human capital is all of the creative skills and knowledge embodied in the employees of a company -- skills that bring ...
  6. Investing

    What's Capitalization?

    Capitalization has different meanings depending on the context.
  7. Investing

    Deferred Tax Liability

    Deferred tax liability is a tax that has been assessed or is due for the current period, but has not yet been paid. The deferral arises because of timing differences between the accrual of the ...
  8. Investing

    Who are Stakeholders?

    “Stakeholder” is used in commerce to describe any party who has an interest in a business or enterprise. Traditionally, stakeholders in a corporation are shareholders, employees, customers and ...
  9. Investing

    Cost and Freight (CFR)

    Cost and freight, called CFR, is a trade term between a buyer and seller. CFR requires the seller to arrange for the transport of goods by sea to the required port. It also requires the seller ...
  10. Professionals

    What are Core Competencies?

    Core competencies are the essence of what a company does well. A business uses its core competencies to make and develop products, goods and services according to its company mission. Core competencies ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed Cost

    A cost that does not change with an increase or decrease in the amount of goods or services produced. Fixed costs are expenses ...
  2. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  3. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  4. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  5. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  6. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
Trading Center