Pareto Improvement

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DEFINITION of 'Pareto Improvement'

In neoclassical economics, an action done in an economy that harms no one and helps at least one person. The theory suggests that Pareto improvements will keep adding to the economy until it achieves a Pareto equilibrium, where no more Pareto improvements can be made.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pareto Improvement'

In real-world economics, the Pareto improvement is often replaced by the Kaldor-Hicks improvement, of which Pareto improvements are a subset. A Kaldor-Hicks improvement is associated with cost-benefit improvements and is related in terms of actual dollars.

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