Parking

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DEFINITION of 'Parking'

A form of kiting shares that a brokerage commits by moving long positions in unrelated accounts to cover short positions that are improperly settled according to SEC regulations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Parking'

When parking shares, brokerage firms are attempting to cover undeclared short positions left over from transactions whose stock was not delivered by the settlement date. Rather than performing a buy-in transaction, these firms collude with one another and, by delaying the settlement process, inflate the number of shares available for trade in the secondary market.

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