Partial Redemption

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DEFINITION of 'Partial Redemption'

An investment-transaction classification that refers to the withdrawal of a portion of a security's value by the owner. Rather than withdrawing the entire amount of his or her security's value from the account, an investor may prefer to keep a portion of the value invested in the asset while still obtaining some cash.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Partial Redemption'

For example, a partial redemption occurs if an investor orders the withdrawal of a portion of Treasury notes held in an account. The account owner would specify the proportion of the asset he or she would like to withdraw; the amount withdrawn includes a portion of the asset's principal and interest earned.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why would an investor opt for a partial redemption as opposed to a full redemption?

    A partial redemption occurs when an investor liquidates some, but not all, of a security's value. For example, suppose an ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Where can I buy government bonds?

    The type of bond determines where you can purchase it, so you need to decide which type of bond you would like to purchase ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are long-term U.S. government bonds risk-free?

    For any debt obligation to be considered completely risk-free, investors must have full faith that the principal and interest ... Read Full Answer >>
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