Partial Redemption

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DEFINITION of 'Partial Redemption'

An investment-transaction classification that refers to the withdrawal of a portion of a security's value by the owner. Rather than withdrawing the entire amount of his or her security's value from the account, an investor may prefer to keep a portion of the value invested in the asset while still obtaining some cash.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Partial Redemption'

For example, a partial redemption occurs if an investor orders the withdrawal of a portion of Treasury notes held in an account. The account owner would specify the proportion of the asset he or she would like to withdraw; the amount withdrawn includes a portion of the asset's principal and interest earned.

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RELATED FAQS
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