Patent Reexamination


DEFINITION of 'Patent Reexamination'

A process conducted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on a patent that already has been issued in order to verify the claims and scope of the patent. A patent reexamination is usually brought about by the original patent holder when that party feels another party has produced a product or service that infringes on its patent. Both parties are given the opportunity to state their cases in writing, and then the USPTO will render its judgment. The reexamination process originated as a cheaper and faster way to settle patent disputes rather than through litigation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Patent Reexamination'

Patents and other intellectual properties are an extremely valuable asset for a company - one worth protecting. In certain industries, such as technology and generic drugs, patent disputes involve very large stakes in today's marketplace, and the outcome of a patent reexamination or trial can cause big swings in the underlying stocks of the companies involved.

  1. Letters Patent

    A legal instrument that grants the exclusive rights of an invention ...
  2. Patent Troll

    A derogatory term used to describe people or companies that misuse ...
  3. Intangible Asset

    An asset that is not physical in nature. Corporate intellectual ...
  4. Comparative Advantage

    The ability of a firm or individual to produce goods and/or services ...
  5. Economic Moat

    The competitive advantage that one company has over other companies ...
  6. Patent

    A government license that gives the holder exclusive rights to ...
Related Articles
  1. Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

    Memorable advertising is a brick in the fortress that keeps competitors at bay.
  2. Investing Basics

    Patents Are Assets, So Learn How To Value Them

    Innovation is the key to staying on top. Find out how companies protect their ideas and how to figure out how much they're worth.
  3. Markets

    Buying Into Corporate Research & Development (R&D)

    Investors take note: companies that cut research and development are in danger of saving today but losing big tomorrow.
  4. Investing Basics

    What are the fiduciary responsibilities of board members?

    Find out what fiduciary duties a board of directors owes to the company and its shareholders, including the duties of care, good faith and loyalty.
  5. Investing News

    What Affirmative Action Means for Businesses

    A look at what Affirmative Action means for your business.
  6. Investing

    Protect Your Creations--Register Your Trademark

    Federally registering your brand name or logo offers the broadest protection against potential trademark infringement.
  7. Entrepreneurship

    Hiring? Regulations Small Businesses Need to Know

    When a small business becomes an employer, it has new responsibilities. Make sure you familiarize yourself with regulatory requirements.
  8. Economics

    China's Former One-Child Policy Explained

    A look at China's former plan to control population growth.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    What This Market Timing Ruling Means for Investors

    What the Janus Supreme Court ruling on market timing means for investors and advisors.
  10. Economics

    The 5 Countries That Produce the Most Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

    Learn about the top five countries, China, the United States, India, Russia and Japan, that are the largest contributors to carbon dioxide emissions.
  1. What is an economic moat?

    The term economic moat, coined and popularized by Warren Buffett, refers to a business' ability to maintain competitive advantages ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can the IRS audit you after a refund?

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can audit tax returns even after it has issued a tax refund to a taxpayer. According ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does escheatment impact a company?

    In recent years, state governments have become increasingly aggressive in enforcing escheatment laws. As a result, many businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What happens if property is wrongfully escheated?

    If your financial accounts, such as bank, investment or savings accounts, are declared dormant and the managing financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do financial advisors help you avoid escheatment?

    Financial advisors can help you avoid the escheatment of your financial assets by regularly reviewing all of your accounts, ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  2. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  3. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  4. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  5. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
  6. Discount Bond

    A bond that is issued for less than its par (or face) value, or a bond currently trading for less than its par value in the ...
Trading Center