Patent Reexamination

A A A

DEFINITION

A process conducted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) on a patent that already has been issued in order to verify the claims and scope of the patent. A patent reexamination is usually brought about by the original patent holder when that party feels another party has produced a product or service that infringes on its patent. Both parties are given the opportunity to state their cases in writing, and then the USPTO will render its judgment. The reexamination process originated as a cheaper and faster way to settle patent disputes rather than through litigation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Patents and other intellectual properties are an extremely valuable asset for a company - one worth protecting. In certain industries, such as technology and generic drugs, patent disputes involve very large stakes in today's marketplace, and the outcome of a patent reexamination or trial can cause big swings in the underlying stocks of the companies involved.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Letters Patent

    A legal instrument that grants the exclusive rights of an invention to an individual ...
  2. Patent Troll

    A derogatory term used to describe people or companies that misuse patents as ...
  3. Intangible Asset

    An asset that is not physical in nature. Corporate intellectual property (items ...
  4. Patent

    A government license that gives the holder exclusive rights to a process, design ...
  5. Proprietary Technology

    A process, tool, system or similar item that is the property of a business or ...
  6. Patent Share

    The percentage share of a universe of patents owned or created by one subset ...
  7. Field Of Use

    Restrictions that are placed on a license granted for the use of an existing ...
  8. Economic Moat

    The competitive advantage that one company has over other companies in the same ...
  9. Comparative Advantage

    The ability of a firm or individual to produce goods and/or services at a lower ...
  10. Baked In The Cake

    Projections, expectations and other news items that are already reflected in ...
Related Articles
  1. Patents Are Assets, So Learn How To ...
    Investing Basics

    Patents Are Assets, So Learn How To ...

  2. Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats
    Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

  3. Buying Into Corporate Research & Development ...
    Markets

    Buying Into Corporate Research & Development ...

  4. What is an economic moat?
    Investing

    What is an economic moat?

  5. When, Why And How To File A Complaint ...
    Credit & Loans

    When, Why And How To File A Complaint ...

  6. Eight Financial Safeguards If Disaster ...
    Personal Finance

    Eight Financial Safeguards If Disaster ...

  7. Are there regulations against monopolies?
    Markets

    Are there regulations against monopolies?

  8. What is the Dodd-Frank Act? How does ...
    Economics

    What is the Dodd-Frank Act? How does ...

  9. How Effective Is The Chinese Wall?
    Investing Basics

    How Effective Is The Chinese Wall?

  10. Why Banks Are Scrambling To Hear Your ...
    Personal Finance

    Why Banks Are Scrambling To Hear Your ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Genuine Progress Indicator - GPI

    A metric used to measure the economic growth of a country. It is often considered as a replacement to the more well known gross domestic product (GDP) economic indicator. The GPI indicator takes everything the GDP uses into account, but also adds other figures that represent the cost of the negative effects related to economic activity (such as the cost of crime, cost of ozone depletion and cost of resource depletion, among others).
  2. Accelerated Share Repurchase - ASR

    A specific method by which corporations can repurchase outstanding shares of their stock. The accelerated share repurchase (ASR) is usually accomplished by the corporation purchasing shares of its stock from an investment bank. The investment bank borrows the shares from clients or share lenders and sells them to the company.
  3. Microeconomic Pricing Model

    A model of the way prices are set within a market for a given good. According to this model, prices are set based on the balance of supply and demand in the market. In general, profit incentives are said to resemble an "invisible hand" that guides competing participants to an equilibrium price. The demand curve in this model is determined by consumers attempting to maximize their utility, given their budget.
  4. Centralized Market

    A financial market structure that consists of having all orders routed to one central exchange with no other competing market. The quoted prices of the various securities listed on the exchange represent the only price that is available to investors seeking to buy or sell the specific asset.
  5. Balanced Investment Strategy

    A portfolio allocation and management method aimed at balancing risk and return. Such portfolios are generally divided equally between equities and fixed-income securities.
  6. Negative Carry

    A situation in which the cost of holding a security exceeds the yield earned. A negative carry situation is typically undesirable because it means the investor is losing money. An investor might, however, achieve a positive after-tax yield on a negative carry trade if the investment comes with tax advantages, as might be the case with a bond whose interest payments were nontaxable.
Trading Center