USA Patriot Act

DEFINITION of 'USA Patriot Act'

A law passed shortly after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the United States giving law enforcement agencies increased, broad powers to bring terrorists to justice. The USA Patriot Act is an acronym for Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism.

BREAKING DOWN 'USA Patriot Act'

Since its inception, the Patriot Act has been shrouded in controversy. Proponents of the act believe that it is a necessary evil in the face of new threats to America in the ever-changing international political climate. Civil libertarians see it as an unpatriotic means of limiting civil rights, infringing on free speech, interfering with freedom of the press and infringing on individual privacy rights.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Personal Property

    A type of property which, in its most general definition, can ...
  2. Property

    1. Anything over which a person or business has legal title. ...
  3. Political Risk

    The risk that an investment's returns could suffer as a result ...
  4. Legislative Risk

    The risk that legislation by the government could significantly ...
  5. New York Stock Exchange - NYSE

    A stock exchange based in New York City, which is considered ...
  6. Exon-Florio Provision

    A provision that allows the president of the United States to ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Terrorism's Effects on Wall Street

    Terrorist activity tends to have a negative impact on the markets, but just how much? Find out how to take cover.
  2. Economics

    The Biggest Items Obama Is Still Missing From His Mandate

    Learn how the biggest items missing from Obama's mandate include various forms of tax reform and closing the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    A Look At National Debt And Government Bonds

    Learn the functions of the U.S. Treasury, and find out how and why it issues debt.
  4. Personal Finance

    What it Takes to Get a Green Card

    Grounds for getting a green card include having family members in the U.S., being a certain type of refugee or specialized worker, or winning a lottery.
  5. Career Education & Resources

    Laws & Regulations To Know Before Changing the Name of Your Business

    Discover some of the most important steps you need to take after making a decision to change your legally established business name.
  6. Personal Finance

    Passport Procrastinators: This Year, Renew Early!

    Millions of passports issued nearly 10 years ago when the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative became law are expiring. Expect backlogs; leave extra time.
  7. Term

    Understanding Rule 144A

    Rule 144A is an SEC rule that changes the two-year holding period requirement on privately placed securities.
  8. Retirement

    Power of Attorney: When It's Critical to Get One

    "The sooner the better" is the usual answer.
  9. Markets

    Privateer Holdings Revolutionizes the Cannabis Industry

    Watch Privateer Holdings succeed by bringing more respectability to the legalized medical and recreational marijuana and industries.
  10. Forex

    Bitcoin's Main Stumbling Block: Navigating The Law

    Coders created Bitcoin to be decentralized and independent of governments and banks. Authorities are still struggling to create a legal framework.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the requirements for opening a savings account in the United States?

    Nearly half of all Americans use a savings account with a bank or credit union as a personal savings vehicle. A savings account ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do brokers ask for personal information before they make any trades?

    According to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), there are three main reasons why a broker will ask for personal ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the Writ of Mandamus?

    A writ of mandamus is a court order issued by a judge at a petitioner’s request compelling someone to execute a duty he is ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Can the IRS audit you after a refund?

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can audit tax returns even after it has issued a tax refund to a taxpayer. According ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does escheatment impact a company?

    In recent years, state governments have become increasingly aggressive in enforcing escheatment laws. As a result, many businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  2. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  3. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  4. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  5. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
Trading Center