DEFINITION of 'Pay To Bearer'

Any check or draft that can be transferred to the holder by delivery without having to be endorsed. As the name implies, "pay to bearer" refers to any negotiable instrument that is simply paid to the bearer without requiring proof of identity. Pay-to-bearer instruments are not registered in the name of a specific owner and will pay to whoever bears them.

BREAKING DOWN 'Pay To Bearer'

A bearer bond is one type of pay-to-bearer instrument. These bonds pay interest for each detachable coupon redeemed, regardless of who redeems them.

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