Pay Yourself First

What does 'Pay Yourself First' mean

Pay yourself first is a phrase commonly used in personal finance and retirement planning literature that means to automatically route your specified savings contribution from each paycheck at the time it is received.

Because the savings contributions are automatically routed from each paycheck to your investment account, this process is said to be "paying yourself first"; in other words, paying yourself before you begin paying your monthly living expenses and making discretionary purchases.

BREAKING DOWN 'Pay Yourself First'

This simple system is touted by many personal finance professionals and retirement planners as a very effective way of ensuring that individuals continue to make their chosen savings contributions month after month. It removes the temptation to skip a given month's contribution and the risk that funds will be spent before the contribution has been made.

Regular, consistent savings contributions go a long way toward building a long-term nest egg, and some financial professionals even go so far as to call "pay yourself first" the golden rule of personal finance.

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