P/E 30 Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'P/E 30 Ratio'

The price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio is the valuation ratio of a company's market value per share divided by a company's earnings per share (EPS). A P/E ratio of 30 means that a company's stock price is trading at 30 times the company's earnings per share.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'P/E 30 Ratio'

A P/E of 30 is high by historical stock market standards. This type of valuation is usually placed on only the fastest-growing companies by investors in the company's early stages of growth. Once a company becomes more mature, it will grow more slowly and the P/E tends to decline.

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