Pegging

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DEFINITION of 'Pegging'

1. A method of stabilizing a country's currency by fixing its exchange rate to that of another country.

2. A practice of an investor buying large amounts of an underlying commodity or security close to the expiry date of a derivative held by the investor. This is done to encourage a favorable move in market price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pegging'

1. Most countries peg their exchange rate to that of the United States.

2. An investor writing a put option would practice pegging so that he or she will not be required, due to lowering prices, to purchase the underlying security or commodity from the option holder. The goal is to have the option expire worthless so that the premium initially received by the writer is protected.

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