Perfect Hedge

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DEFINITION of 'Perfect Hedge'

A position undertaken by an investor that would eliminate the risk of an existing position, or a position that eliminates all market risk from a portfolio. In order to be a perfect hedge, a position would need to have a 100% inverse correlation to the initial position. As such, the perfect hedge is rarely found.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Perfect Hedge'

A common example of a near-perfect hedge would be an investor using a combination of held stock and opposing options positions to self-insure against any loss in the stock position. The cost of this strategy is that it also limits the upside potential of the stock position.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Is it possible to be perfectly hedged against risk?

    Buying into a debt or equity investment creates a wide range of potential risks for investors. Market risk may reduce an ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between hedging and speculation?

    Hedging involves taking an offsetting position in a derivative in order to balance any gains and losses to the underlying ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What risks should I consider taking a short put position?

    The risks to consider before taking a short put position are the odds of sustained weakness in the asset price and a spike ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens if a software glitch fails to execute the strike price I set?

    If you've ever suffered the frustrating experience of having an order not filled or had a strike price fail to execute because ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why should I consider buying an option if it's out-of-the-money?

    One situation when a trader may want to buy an out-of-the-money option is to hedge a stock position. A trader may want to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do traders use out-of-the-money options to hedge?

    Traders can utilize out-of-the-money options to hedge an existing market position by either buying or selling options. A ... Read Full Answer >>
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