Perpetual Bond

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Perpetual Bond'

A bond with no maturity date. Perpetual bonds are not redeemable but pay a steady stream of interest forever. Some of the only notable perpetual bonds in existence are those that were issued by the British Treasury to pay off smaller issues used to finance the Napoleonic Wars (1814). Some in the U.S. believe it would be more efficient for the government to issue perpetual bonds, which may help it avoid the refinancing costs associated with bond issues that have maturity dates.

A perpetual bond is also known as a 'consol'.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Perpetual Bond'

Since perpetual bond payments are similar to stock dividend payments - as they both offer some sort of return for an indefinite period of time - it is logical that they would be priced the same way. The price of a perpetual bond is therefore the fixed interest payment, or coupon amount, divided by some constant discount rate, which represents the speed at which money loses value over time (partly because of inflation). The discount rate denominator reduces the real value of the nominally fixed coupon amounts over time, eventually making this value equal zero. As such, perpetual bonds, even though they pay interest forever, can be assigned a finite value, which in turn represents their price.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Coupon

    The interest rate stated on a bond when it's issued. The coupon ...
  2. Annuity

    A financial product that pays out a fixed stream of payments ...
  3. Undated Issue

    A government bond that has no maturity date, and pays interest ...
  4. Yield

    The income return on an investment. This refers to the interest ...
  5. Maturity Date

    The date on which the principal amount of a note, draft, acceptance ...
  6. Perpetuity

    A constant stream of identical cash flows with no end. The formula ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is a corporate bond taxed?

    A corporate bond is taxed through the interest earned on the bond, through capital gains or losses earned in the early sale ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between the cost of capital and the discount rate?

    The cost of capital refers to the actual cost of financing business activity through either debt or equity capital. The discount ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is Manchester United (MANU) carrying so much debt?

    The takeover of Manchester United by the Glazer family beginning in 2005 saddled the historic club with substantial amounts ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I use the principles of convexity to compare bonds?

    Convexity, along with another principle known as duration, is an important consideration when assessing bond risk. All else ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What can cause a security to go from investment grade to "junk" grade?

    The most common reason for a debt security downgrade from investment grade to junk grade is a negative change in the bond ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is affected by the interest rate risk?

    Interest rate risk is the risk that arises when the absolute level of interest rates fluctuate. Interest rate risk directly ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    The Advantages Of Bonds

    Bonds contribute an element of stability to almost any portfolio and offer a safe and conservative investment.
  2. Retirement

    Bond Basics Tutorial

    Investing in bonds - What are they, and do they belong in your portfolio?
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Advanced Bond Concepts

    Learn the complex concepts and calculations for trading bonds including bond pricing, yield, term structure of interest rates and duration.
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Muni Bonds, Taxable Bonds or CDs: Which is Best?

    Here's how to tell if municipal bonds are a better investment than taxable bonds or CDs.
  5. Investing Basics

    What is a Nominal Value?

    The nominal value of a security, such as a stock or bond, remains fixed for the duration of its life.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  7. Investing Basics

    Understanding Financial Instruments

    Financial instrument is a general term used to describe a monetary asset.
  8. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  9. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  10. Professionals

    Why You Should Avoid Fixating on Bond Duration

    Financial advisors and their clients should then focus on a bond fund’s portfolio rather than relying on any single metric like duration.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  2. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  3. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  4. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  5. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  6. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
Trading Center