Perpetual Inventory

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DEFINITION of 'Perpetual Inventory'

A method of accounting for inventory that records the sale or purchase of inventory in near real-time, through the use of computerized point-of-sale and enterprise asset management systems. Perpetual inventory provides a highly detailed view of changes in inventory and allows real-time reporting of the amount of inventory in stock, hence, accurately reflecting the level of goods on hand.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Perpetual Inventory'

A perpetual inventory system is superior to the older periodic inventory systems because it allows for real-time tracking of sales as well as inventory levels for individual items, helping to prevent stock outs. A perpetual inventory also does not need to be adjusted manually by the company's accountants except to the extent it disagrees with the physical inventory count due to loss, breakage or theft.

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