Per Share Basis

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DEFINITION of 'Per Share Basis'

A measure used in the financial world to illustrate the quantity of something for one share of a company's stock. Such measures are used in the analysis and valuation of a company. Examples include 'earnings per share', 'cash per share', 'revenue per share' and 'debt per share'.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Per Share Basis'

To measure something on a per share basis, take the total quantity of whatever you are measuring and divide it by the number of outstanding shares in the company. For example if the earnings of a company is $2 million and there are 4 million shares, the earnings on a per share basis is $0.50 per share.

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