Personal Finance

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DEFINITION of 'Personal Finance'

All financial decisions and activities of an individual, this could include budgeting, insurance, savings, investing, debt servicing, mortgages and more. Financial planning generally involves analyzing your current financial position and predicting short-term and long-term needs.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Personal Finance'

Personal finance looks at how your money and future is managed. Often individuals will seek advice from financial planners, but the use of software or websites is also an option. For example personal finance would include monitoring your spending, budgeting for an emergency fund, and paying down debt.

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