Philadelphia Fed Survey

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DEFINITION of 'Philadelphia Fed Survey'

A business outlook survey used to construct an index that tracks manufacturing conditions in the Philadelphia Federal Reserve district. The Philadelphia Fed survey is an indicator of trends in the manufacturing sector, and is correlated with the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) manufacturing index, as well as the industrial production index.

Also known as the Philly Fed Survey.

BREAKING DOWN 'Philadelphia Fed Survey'

The survey gives investors a detailed look at how busy the manufacturing sector is, and can have a significant effect on the markets. Since manufacturing is a major sector of the U.S. economy, an increase in the index can indicate an uptrend in the economy.

Investors use data from the Philadelphia Fed Survey to provide insight on equity markets, the prices of which are affected positively by increased corporate profits. On the other hand, as the economy heats up, inflation will be expected to increase, so bond markets would be negatively affected.

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