Phoenix Dollars

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DEFINITION of 'Phoenix Dollars '

One-ounce silver disks introduced in October 2005 by an individual named Gordon Hayes. Phoenix Dollars are not legal tender or official currency as they are not endorsed by any sovereign government, nation or state. Phoenix Dollars were introduced as a means of protecting wealth because their value does not depend on fiat currency, but is based on the market price of silver. They have a reeded edge as a security feature.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Phoenix Dollars '

Phoenix Dollars are not associated with the city of Phoenix, Arizona. According to their creator, Hayes, they derive their name from the mythical Phoenix bird, as a metaphorical representation of the death of the old currency system and the birth of the new.

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