Pipeline

What is a 'Pipeline'

A pipeline is an investment company whose purpose is to collect investment funds from a pool of individual investors and invest them in financial securities.

2) The underwriting procedure which must be completed by the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) before a security can be offered for sale to the public.

3) A type of risk most often present in mortgage transactions. It expresses the potential for change in financial factors during the time lapse between the mortgage application and the purchase of the property.

BREAKING DOWN 'Pipeline'

1) Such firms are usually exempt from normal corporate taxes, since they simply serve as an investment conduit, or pipeline, rather than actually producing goods and services as a regular corporation does. A mutual fund structured as a trust would be exempt from corporate taxes and considered an investment pipeline.

2) A new security issue must go through the SEC's pipeline before it is legally cleared for sale to the public. This practice attempts to screen out fraudulent investments and ensures security offerings are presented to the public in an accurate fashion.

3) During the time it takes for a bank to review a mortgage application and for a borrower to actually purchase their desired property (the mortgage pipeline), financial conditions specific to the application can change, which would change the amount of risk the bank incurs by lending funds to the borrower.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Mortgage Pipeline

    Mortgage loans that have been locked in with a mortgage originator ...
  2. Public Offering

    The sale of equity shares or other financial instruments by an ...
  3. Underwriter

    An underwriter is a company or other entity that administers ...
  4. Real Estate Mortgage Investment ...

    A complex pool of mortgage securities created for the purpose ...
  5. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  6. SEC Form N-17f-2

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that ...
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    Exploring Real Estate Investments: Buying And Owning Real Estate

    By Ian Woychuk, CFA In Chapter 2, we presented the investment selection matrix, which outlines your alternatives when choosing the kind of real estate investment to make. You can choose to invest ...
  2. Insurance

    Behind the Scenes of Your Mortgage

    Four major players slice and dice your mortgage in the secondary market.
  3. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  4. Insurance

    The Rise Of The Modern Investment Bank

    Get to know a little bit about the institutions whose actions help to guide free markets.
  5. Economics

    What Does an Underwriter Do?

    In the investment world, an underwriter is a company that helps corporations or other issuing bodies distribute their securities.
  6. Professionals

    How To Get A Job At The SEC

    Want to make a good living taking on those renegade trading rascals on Wall Street? Here are some tips to help you get in the door at the SEC.
  7. Wealth Management

    The Most Important Factors that Affect Mortgage Rates

    Discover what the most important factors are that affect mortgage interest rates. Factors range from inflation and economic growth to Federal Reserve activity, .
  8. Products and Investments

    Reverse Mortgages: Right for Clients? Not Often

    Reverse mortgages are a legitimate vehicle for folks age 62 and up to tap into the equity in their homes for other uses. Here's what to consider with them.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Benefits of Picking Mutual Funds Over Individual Stocks

    Learn about the advantages of investing in mutual funds rather than individual stocks, including the benefits of affordability, oversight and diversification.
  10. Home & Auto

    Shopping for a mortgage in 2016? Use this tool first.

    As home-buying technology has progressed, the process of finding the best mortgages rates for 2016 can all be done online.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do I know if I am buying unregistered securities or stocks?

    All securities, including stocks, bonds and notes, must be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) before ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are unregistered securities or stocks?

    Before securities, like stocks, bonds and notes, can be offered for sale to the public, they first must be registered with ... Read Answer >>
  3. What information does the SEC require in an investment company's prospectus?

    Understand the lengthy list of required information that investment companies such as mutual funds must include in a prospectus ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is an unregistered security scam?

    Each year, millions of Americans lose money to con artists who convince them to invest in companies through "private offerings" ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is the 1003 mortgage application form?

    Learn about the 1003 mortgage application form, what information it requires and why this form is the industry standard for ... Read Answer >>
  6. How does FINRA differ from the SEC?

    With all the financial organizations out there, knowing what they all do can be as complicated as knowing where to invest. ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Demand Curve

    The demand curve is a graphical representation of the relationship between the price of a good or service and the quantity ...
  2. Goldilocks Economy

    An economy that is not so hot that it causes inflation, and not so cold that it causes a recession. This term is used to ...
  3. White Squire

    Very similar to a "white knight", but instead of purchasing a majority interest, the squire purchases a lesser interest in ...
  4. MACD Technical Indicator

    Moving Average Convergence Divergence (or MACD) is a trend-following momentum indicator that shows the relationship between ...
  5. Over-The-Counter - OTC

    Over-The-Counter (or OTC) is a security traded in some context other than on a formal exchange such as the NYSE, TSX, AMEX, ...
  6. Quarter - Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4

    A three-month period on a financial calendar that acts as a basis for the reporting of earnings and the paying of dividends.
Trading Center