Pipeline

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Pipeline'

1) An investment company whose purpose is to collect investment funds from a pool of individual investors and invest them in financial securities.

2) The underwriting procedure which must be completed by the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) before a security can be offered for sale to the public.

3) A type of risk most often present in mortgage transactions. It expresses the potential for change in financial factors during the time lapse between the mortgage application and the purchase of the property.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pipeline'

1) Such firms are usually exempt from normal corporate taxes, since they simply serve as an investment conduit, or pipeline, rather than actually producing goods and services as a regular corporation does. A mutual fund structured as a trust would be exempt from corporate taxes and considered an investment pipeline.

2) A new security issue must go through the SEC's pipeline before it is legally cleared for sale to the public. This practice attempts to screen out fraudulent investments and ensures security offerings are presented to the public in an accurate fashion.

3) During the time it takes for a bank to review a mortgage application and for a borrower to actually purchase their desired property (the mortgage pipeline), financial conditions specific to the application can change, which would change the amount of risk the bank incurs by lending funds to the borrower.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Mortgage

    A debt instrument, secured by the collateral of specified real ...
  2. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  3. Investment Income

    Income coming from interest payments, dividends, capital gains ...
  4. Default Risk

    The event in which companies or individuals will be unable to ...
  5. Corporate Tax

    A levy placed on the profit of a firm, with different rates used ...
  6. Public Offering

    The sale of equity shares or other financial instruments by an ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the double taxation of dividends?

    After all is said and done, companies that have made a profit can do one of two things with the excess cash. They can (1) ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are so-called self-offering and self-management covered by "Financial Instruments ...

    As the Financial Services Agency (FSA) explains, self-offering of interests in collective investment schemes falls under ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When might an abatement be granted by the IRS?

    The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) frequently imposes interest and penalties due to the late filing of a tax return, underpayment ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens when I want to sell my A-shares of a mutual fund?

    Typically, commissions or other sales charges may apply when a mutual fund is sold. This is an important factor in deciding ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does the information ratio tell about the design of a mutual fund?

    The information ratio can tell an investor how well a mutual fund is designed to deliver excess or abnormal returns as well ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Is it better to buy A-shares or a no-load mutual fund?

    Mutual funds and other pooled investments are popular among investors because they provide a level of diversity and professional ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Economics

    What Is Fiscal Policy?

    Learn how governments adjust taxes and spending to moderate the economy.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Evaluating Pharmaceutical Companies

    Learn how to find a healthy pharmaceutical investment in a market full of weak drugs.
  3. Professionals

    What Does an Investment Banker Do?

    An investment banker works for a financial institution that helps companies, governments and agencies raise money by issuing securities.
  4. Professionals

    Worried About Stocks? Try on Convertibles

    Convertibles are a good hedge against equity market risk (if you're o.k. with losing a bit of upside potential).
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Looking To Invest In Texas? Here Is How

    Ranging from energy to household names, here are some of the top investment opportunities in Texas.
  6. Investing Basics

    Explaining the Volcker Rule

    The Volcker Rule prevents commercial banks from engaging in high-risk, speculative trading for their own accounts.
  7. Investing Basics

    What is a Greenshoe Option?

    A greenshoe option is a provision in an underwriting agreement that allows the underwriter to buy up to 15% of the shares in an IPO at the offer price.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Does a Financial Intermediary Do?

    A financial intermediary is an institution that acts as a go-between in a financial transaction.
  9. Entrepreneurship

    Corporate Inversion: How It Works

    Large corporations are making all kinds of moves to decrease expenses and increase profits in an increasingly competitive global market.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    4 Ways You Can Invest In Gold Without Holding It

    Owning gold can be a store of value and a hedge against unexpected inflation. Holding physical gold, however, can be cumbersome and costly. Fortunately, there are several ways to own gold without ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!