Pitchbook

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DEFINITION

A sales book created by an investment bank/firm that details the main attributes of the firm. The pitchbook is used by the firm's sales force to aid it with selling products and issues, and generating new clients.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

There are two main types of pitchbooks. There is the main pitchbook, which contains all of the main attributes of the firm - such as the number of analysts it has, its prior IPO success and the number of deals it completes per year - which the sales team should focus on when selling the benefits of the firm to potential clients. The second type of pitchbook contains details about a specific deal, such as a company's IPO. This form of pitchbook focuses on all of the benefits of the issue, helping brokers and investment bankers demonstrate how the firm can service the specific needs of their potential clients.


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