Planned Urban Development - PUD

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DEFINITION of 'Planned Urban Development - PUD'

A type of community zoning classification that is planned and developed within a city, municipality and/or state that contains both residential and non-residential buildings (such as shopping centers). Open land, such as for parks, is also often included in the zones

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Planned Urban Development - PUD'

In order to make certain communities more attractive and self sufficient, city planners will provide them with both residential and professional zoning. This allows for the development of homes, shopping centers and/or light industry, as well as recreation areas such as parks. Areas such as these are valuable in that they provide their inhabitants with both housing and a place to work.

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