Plottage

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DEFINITION of 'Plottage'

A real estate term referring to the process of combining adjacent parcels of land to form one larger parcel. Typically the value of the whole parcel will be greater than the sum of the individual smaller parcels.


Also called assemblage.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Plottage'

Plottage refers to the merging or consolidating of adjacent lots into one larger lot, with the consequent result of improved usability and increased value. The value of the combined asset is larger than the sum of its parts because larger structures can be built on the land and its functionality is increased.

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