Plunge Team

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DEFINITION of 'Plunge Team'

A colloquial reference to a group of economic leaders within the United States whose purpose is to ensure the nation's financial markets are efficient, competitive, and provide confidence for investors.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Plunge Team'

Created by Ronald Reagan in 1988 to deal with the crash of 1987, the group was formed due to Executive Order 12631.

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