Point-Of-Sale Terminal

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DEFINITION of 'Point-Of-Sale Terminal'

A type of electronic-transaction terminal. Point-of-sale terminals typically include a computer, a cash register and other equipment or software used to sell goods or services. They also transmit sales data to be posted to customer accounts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Point-Of-Sale Terminal'

The most common type of terminal is the electronic cash register used by volume-transaction merchants such as department stores. Common among all point-of-sale terminals is the emphasis on speed of operation and ease of use of the hardware and software.

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