Point Of Sale - POS

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DEFINITION of 'Point Of Sale - POS'

The place where sales are made. On a macro level, a point of sale may be a mall, market or city. On a micro-level, retailers consider a point of sale to be the area surrounding the counter where customers pay.


Also known as "point of purchase".

BREAKING DOWN 'Point Of Sale - POS'

The point of sale for products and services is an important focus for marketers, because consumers tend to make purchasing decisions on very high-margin products or services at these strategic locations. Points of sale may be real, as in the case of a "brick and mortar" store, or virtual, as in the case of an electronic retailer that sells goods and services over the internet.

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