Point of Purchase - POP

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DEFINITION of 'Point of Purchase - POP'

A place where sales are made. On a macro-level, a point of purchase may be a mall, market or city. On a micro-level, retailers consider a point of purchase to be the area surrounding the counter where customers pay. Also known as "point of sale".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Point of Purchase - POP'

In recent years, the point of purchase for products and services has become an important focus for marketers, because consumers tend to make purchasing decisions on very high-margin products or services at these strategic locations. Points of purchase may be real, as in the case of a "brick and mortar" store, or virtual, as in the case of an electronic retailer that sells goods and services over the internet.

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