Pooled Internal Rate Of Return - PIRR

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DEFINITION of 'Pooled Internal Rate Of Return - PIRR'

A method of calculating the overall internal rate of return (IRR) of a portfolio of several projects by combining their individual cashflows. The overall IRR of the portfolio is then calculated from this pooled cash flow.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pooled Internal Rate Of Return - PIRR'

The pooled IRR concept can be applied, for example, in the case of a private equity group that has several funds. The pooled IRR can establish the overall IRR for the private equity group, and is better suited for this purpose than say average IRR of the funds, which may not give an accurate picture of overall performance.

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