Pooled Funds

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DEFINITION of 'Pooled Funds'

Funds from many individual investors that are aggregated for the purposes of investment, as in the case of a mutual or pension fund. Investors in pooled fund investments benefit from economies of scale, which allow for lower trading costs per dollar of investment, diversification and professional money management.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pooled Funds'

The enormous advantages of investing in pooled fund vehicles make them an ideal asset for many investors. There are added costs involved in the form of management fees, but these fees have been steadily declining for many years as competition has increased. The main detractor of pooled fund investments is that capital gains are spread evenly among all investors - sometimes at the expense of new shareholders.

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  1. What is the difference between exchange traded funds (ETFs) and closed end funds?

    Investors have a number of options available to them when it comes to investing in pooled funds. While mutual funds offer ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Investors have a variety of pooled fund investment options, including mutual funds and money market funds, that can meet ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do you calculate the cost basis for a mutual fund over an extended time period?

    Investors must pay taxes on any investment gains they realize. Subsequently, any capital gain realized by an investor over ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What mutual funds can be used for investing in the industrial sector?

    The industrial goods sector provides investors access to companies that engage in activities such as aerospace and defense, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between a custodian bank and a mutual fund custodian?

    Custodian banks and mutual fund custodians, commonly known as mutual fund corporations, perform very similar roles for different ... Read Full Answer >>
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