Pop-Up Retail

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DEFINITION of 'Pop-Up Retail'

A retail store that is opened temporarily to take advantage of a trend or a seasonal product. Demand for products sold in pop-up retail is typically short-lived. Pop-up retail stores are found most often in the apparel and toy industries.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pop-Up Retail'

The term "pop-up" refers to the short-term duration of the stores, which "pop up" one day and are gone the next. Halloween costume stores are a common example, as are fireworks stores. Pop-up stores are also beneficial to retailers; in a down market, sellers can take advantage of lower rents and shorter leases if they are looking to generate sales but have a limited amount of inventory.

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