Porter's 5 Forces

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DEFINITION of 'Porter's 5 Forces'

Named after Michael E. Porter, this model identifies and analyzes 5 competitive forces that shape every industry, and helps determine an industry's weaknesses and strengths.

1. Competition in the industry
2. Potential of new entrants into industry
3. Power of suppliers
4. Power of customers
5. Threat of substitute products

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Porter's 5 Forces'

Frequently used to identify an industry's structure in order to determine corporate strategy, Porter's model can be applied to any segment of the economy to search for profitability and attractiveness.

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    Anyone who makes decisions about a company's bottom line can implement Porter's five forces analysis, which is a metric for ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Which of these is not one of Porter's 5 competitive forces?

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