Portfolio Manager

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DEFINITION of 'Portfolio Manager'

The person or persons responsible for investing a mutual, exchange-traded or closed-end fund's assets, implementing its investment strategy and managing the day-to-day portfolio trading.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Portfolio Manager'

The portfolio manager is one of the most important factors to consider when looking at fund investing. Portfolio management can be active or passive (index tracking). Historical performance records indicate that only a minority of active fund managers beat the market indexes.

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