Position Sizing

DEFINITION of 'Position Sizing'

The dollar value being invested into a particular security by an investor. An investor's account size and risk tolerance should be taken into account when determining appropriate position sizing.

BREAKING DOWN 'Position Sizing'

Position sizing basically refers to the size of a position within a particular portfolio, or the dollar amount that an investor is going to trade.

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