Position Trader


DEFINITION of 'Position Trader'

A type of stock trader who holds a position for the long term (from months to years). Long-term traders are not concerned with short-term fluctuations because they believe that their long-term investment horizons will smooth these out.

BREAKING DOWN 'Position Trader'

Many position traders will take a look at weekly or monthly charts to get a sense of where the asset is in a given trend. Position trading is the polar opposite of day trading because the goal is to profit from the move in the primary trend rather than the short-term fluctuations that occur day to day.

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