Positive Correlation

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DEFINITION of 'Positive Correlation '

A relationship between two variables in which both variables move in tandem. A positive correlation exists when as one variable decreases, the other variable also decreases and vice versa. In statistics, a perfect positive correlation is represented by the value +1.00, while a 0.00 indicates no correlation and a -1.00 indicates a perfect negative correlation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Positive Correlation '

Here are a few simple examples of a positive correlation: The more money I save, the more financially secure I feel. The longer I invest, the more compound interest I earn. The less time I spend marketing my business, the fewer new clients I acquire. The more years of education I complete, the higher my earning potential.

A perfect positive correlation means that 100% of the time, the relationship that appears to exist between two variables is positive. It is also possible for two variables to be positively correlated in some, but not all, cases.

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