Post-Retirement Risk

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DEFINITION of 'Post-Retirement Risk'

The potential risks to financial security that a retired individual could encounter. Post-retirement risks can result in unexpected costs and expenses or lower income, which can jeopardize even the best-laid retirement plans.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Post-Retirement Risk'

Most discussion concerning planning for retirement is concentrated on the need to accumulate savings to provide income when paid employment comes to an end. The Society of Actuaries in the United States identified 15 post-retirement risks, which include:

-Personal and family risks
-Healthcare and housing risks
-Financial risks
-Information and public policy risks

Some post-retirement risks can be managed by purchasing insurance, such as life insurance or healthcare insurance. Other risks might require contingency funds to handle unforeseen circumstances.

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