Post-9/11 GI Bill

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DEFINITION

A United States law that provides benefits to military veterans who have taken part in active duty service after September 11, 2001. To be eligible for the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill, an applicant must have served for at least 90 days and still be on active duty, or been honorably discharged or discharged for a disability related to serving. It was passed into law in 2008.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

This legislation, along with the original G.I. Bill (1944) and Montgomery G.I. Bill (1984), represent a continued effort by the U.S. government to provide benefits to veterans returning from duty. The original G.I. Bill was created in response to the failure of the U.S. government to provide benefits to veterans of WWI, the lack of which resulted in protests during the Great Depression.

The Post-9/11 G.I. bill provides funding for training, as well as tuition assistance to veterans. The Bill provides up to three years of benefits and can be used by a veteran up to 15 years after qualifying. An update to the Bill, The Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Improvements Act of 2010, expanded eligibility to members of the National Guard and Active Guard and Reserve.


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