Posted Price


DEFINITION of 'Posted Price'

The price at which a company will buy or sell a commodity. In markets where an official exchange does not operate, traders will often refer to the posted prices of the major companies trading that commodity. The posted price is similar to a company's bid and ask

Also known as "postings".

BREAKING DOWN 'Posted Price'

The posted prices of the major companies are aggregated to form postings, an average price that serves as a benchmark for a commodity. For example, the Western Canadian oil market has no formal exchange. The various grades of oil trade at differentials to the benchmark of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) oil. The major companies, such as Shell or Encana, post prices for each grade of oil as a differential to the WTI. These posted prices serve as the benchmarks for crude oil in Western Canada.

  1. Ask

    The price a seller is willing to accept for a security, also ...
  2. Exchange

    A marketplace in which securities, commodities, derivatives and ...
  3. West Texas Intermediate - WTI

    Light, sweet crude oil commonly referred to as "oil" in the Western ...
  4. Settling Price

    The price used daily by clearing houses to clear all trades and ...
  5. Bid

    1. An offer made by an investor, a trader or a dealer to buy ...
  6. Benchmark

    A standard against which the performance of a security, mutual ...
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