Prediction Market

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DEFINITION of 'Prediction Market'

A collection of people speculating on a variety of events - exchange averages, election results, commodity prices, quarterly sales results or even such things as gross movie receipts. The Iowa Electronic Markets, operated by faculty at the University of Iowa Henry B. Tippie College of Business are among the better known prediction markets in operation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Prediction Market'

Because they represent a wide variety of thoughts and opinions - much like the markets as a whole - prediction markets have proven to be quite effective as a prognostic tool. As a result of their visionary value, prediction markets (sometimes referred to as virtual markets) have been utilized by a number of large companies - like Google, for example.

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