Premium Income

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Premium Income'

1. In investing, income that is earned through the sale of an option. The writer of an option earns premium income; the buyer of the option pays the writer a premium in order to have the right (but not the obligation) to exercise the option at a fixed price and specified date.


2. In insurance, revenues that an insurer receives as premiums paid by its customers for insurance products. When a customer purchases an insurance product, such as a health insurance policy, the customers cost for a specified term of the policy is called the premium.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Premium Income'

1. An option's original sales price is referred to as its premium; this is the price that the buyer of a put or call must pay to the seller (writer) of an options contract. Investors can profit by writing covered options contracts when the underlying stock is owned; or by writing a naked option if the underlying is not owned. If the option expires without being exercised, the option writer profits by the full premium amount.


2. An insurance company's premium income is revenue that is derived from premiums paid by customers. Premiums are paid for all types of insurance policies including health, automobile and home. A premium is the cost paid for coverage under the policy for a certain period of time. This excludes other sources of revenue such as investment income.

RELATED TERMS
  1. At A Premium

    The sale of an asset or item at a price significantly above the ...
  2. Unearned Premium

    The premium corresponding to the time period remaining on an ...
  3. Call

    1. The period of time between the opening and closing of some ...
  4. Options Contract

    A contract that allows the holder to buy or sell an underlying ...
  5. Premium

    1. The total cost of an option. 2. The difference between the ...
  6. Put

    An option contract giving the owner the right, but not the obligation, ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is my insurance premium calculated?

    An insurance premium is the money charged by insurance companies for coverage. Insurance premiums for services differ from ...
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    A Look At Single-Premium Life Insurance

    Want to provide for your dependents and finance your own long-term care? Learn more here.
  2. Home & Auto

    How An Insurance Company Determines Your Premiums

    Find out how insurers use credit history to build an insurance score and how it could affect your bottom line.
  3. Options & Futures

    Trade The Covered Call - Without The Stock

    The standard covered call can be used to hedge positions or generate income. This calendar spread may do so more effectively.
  4. Stock Analysis

    Does It Still Make Sense To Buy IPG Shares?

    Let's look at IPG's earnings, after their Q4 report, and whether the long-term investing thesis is compelling enough to warrant buying shares today.
  5. Stock Analysis

    Why Should You Invest In Stratasys Today?

    When Stratasys pre-announced its fourth-quarter earnings, management highlighted that its MakerBot acquisition was underperforming expectations.
  6. Investing

    What's a Debit Note?

    A debit note is a document used by a seller to inform a purchaser of a dollar amount owed. As the name indicates, it is a note from the seller that a debit has been made to the purchaser’s account. ...
  7. Investing Basics

    What is Profit?

    Profit is a general term used to denote when earnings exceed the expenses incurred to generate those earnings.
  8. Investing

    What's Capitalization?

    Capitalization has different meanings depending on the context.
  9. Investing

    Deferred Tax Liability

    Deferred tax liability is a tax that has been assessed or is due for the current period, but has not yet been paid. The deferral arises because of timing differences between the accrual of the ...
  10. Charts & Patterns

    Why These Are 2015's Most-Promising Bank Stocks

    Which bank stocks should offer the best bang for your buck in 2015? Possibly these, so read on.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  2. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  3. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  4. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  5. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  6. Law Of Supply

    A microeconomic law stating that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity ...
Trading Center