Premium Put Convertible

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DEFINITION of 'Premium Put Convertible'

A convertible bond with an additional put feature that allows it to be redeemed at a premium sometime during its life. As with a put option, the issuer of the premium put convertible bond has an obligation to buy back the bond upon the discretion of the bondholder. Thus, the put option attached to this convertible bond allows it to be redeemed at a premium by the bondholder anytime before maturity.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Premium Put Convertible'

The price of a regular convertible bond is highly dependent on the price of the underlying stock; as the stock price rises, the price of the convertible increases and as the stock price falls, the price of the convertible decreases. This relationship between the premium put convertible and the underlying stock may hold when the stock is rising, but it may be less apparent when the stock is falling, since the put provision provides a degree of downside protection for the premium put convertible.


In exchange for the right to "put" the premium put convertible to the issuer, the bondholder may have to settle for lower coupon payments from the bond. A premium put convertible will, therefore, generally have a lower coupon rate than a regular convertible bond.

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