Prepackaged Bankruptcy

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DEFINITION of 'Prepackaged Bankruptcy'

A plan for financial reorganization that a company prepares in cooperation with its creditors that will take effect once the company enters bankruptcy. This plan must be voted on by shareholders before the company files its petition for bankruptcy, and can result in shorter turnaround times.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Prepackaged Bankruptcy'

The idea behind a prepackaged bankruptcy plan is to shorten and simplify the bankruptcy process in order to save the company money in legal and accounting fees, as well as the amount of time spent in bankruptcy protection. The sooner the company can emerge from bankruptcy, the sooner it can implement its reorganization and return to generating revenues from its core operations.

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